California planning considerations: second marriage, with kids

Individuals and couples in Orange County and elsewhere across California who timely engage in purposeful and comprehensive estate planning often feel a sense of confidence and relief following the creation of a carefully tailored plan.

And that just makes sense, given the feelings that naturally accompany the reduction of uncertainty in life.

And few things can seem more uncertain than the complexities that often swirl around family life. Those can be especially intense when a planning focus is centrally aimed at things like real property, various savings and retirement vehicles, the desired distribution of assets among heirs, the lawful avoidance of taxes, the protection of loved ones with special needs and so forth.

A recent article written by one planner addresses some of the special concerns that can attach when individuals are marrying for a second or subsequent time. For obvious reasons, that specific situation can entail singular concerns revolving around children from former marriages, accrued savings in various investment vehicles, owned realty, personal possessions, business ownership and myriad other matters.

And that can make timely and effective estate planning critically important across a number of fronts, ranging from the protection of assets and surviving family members to the crafting of legal documents (including a will and relevant trusts) that provide for a new spouse and perhaps additional loved ones.

As noted in the above-cited article, California residents who are remarrying often seek “to protect both their surviving children and their new spouse if they become incapacitated and when they die.”

That can spell a cornucopia of concerns, and it draws an admonition from the aforementioned media piece to “consult an attorney regarding any real-life situation.”

A proven estate administration lawyer routinely works with individuals and families of every conceivable type, being legally tasked to promote their best interests in all estate planning matters.

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