Newman Law Group

Wills Archives

Wills are drafted to inform others

Proper estate planning can be a gift to one's loved ones. By outlining a plan for the distribution of assets, an individual may reduce the amount of time and money spent to settle one's estate after a death. Wills are an important tool for individuals in the estate planning process. Individuals in California may wish to know more about the function of a will and how it is implemented. 

Estate planning can foster asset protection

Many individuals will enter the estate planning process at some point in their lives. By using good strategies and avoiding common pitfalls, an individual can feel confident in asset protection. California residents may choose to transfer assets to their heirs in several ways, but if there is an oversight, the people left behind may face costly and inconvenient legal barriers. 

Naming, updating beneficiaries in wills could prove useful

It is not unusual for individuals to have different views on estate planning. Some parties may immediately consider it beneficial, and others may think it unnecessary or at least a low priority. Of course, even California residents who have created wills and other estate planning documents may not use their plans to full advantage if they make mistakes when naming beneficiaries.

Wills could require an update in 2018

The new year brings new tax laws, and new policies may give reason to adjust estate planning documents. The major change is the raising of the threshold for the estate tax, and those individuals who will be affected by the change will likely want to review estate documents. For most people in California, wills and trusts benefit from frequent review, with updates whenever there is a major life change. 

Wills help those who wish to leave a legacy

Thinking about estate planning doesn't have to be a grim reminder of the inevitability of death. Reframe this idea, and it turns into a way to diminish the stress on family and loved ones at the time of one's passing -- a time likely to send those closest to you into a challenging time of grief. Individuals in California can look at estate planning in this light and possibly have some of their concerns alleviated. By learning more about wills, people may be more at ease when the time comes to plan their own will. 

Evolving technology can change how wills are honored

A recent court case shows that attitudes about technology and legal documents are shifting. Not every jurisdiction will share the same interpretation of the law, and in fact, this particular court case did not happen within the United States it serves as an important reminder of how technological updates can affect estate planning. Before individuals start text messaging their wills, though, they should consider the benefits of formal estate planning in California.

Pets can be included in wills

Pets are an important part of many families. Some individuals shudder to think that a pet would be abandoned or separated from everything it knows. That's why, in California, people may choose to include pets in their wills

Updating wills can be vital for correct distribution of estate

Many people tend to neglect the little details of life, until all of a sudden, life springs upon them and they are caught unaware. Updating wills, trusts and other estate planning documents can sometimes fall in the procrastination category. But there are reasons for California residents to pay attention to updates on their estate planning documents. 

Are electronic wills coming to California?

As people reach the end of their lives, they often start to think about how to pass along their legacies and how they want to leave their mark on the world. For hundreds of years, the last chance for a person to make their mark on humanity has been through their last will and testament. Traditionally, wills have been recorded in writing, but with new technology comes new options. Currently, one startup company is trying to bring wills into the electronic age. Will people in California soon be making e-wills?