Newman Law Group

January 2019 Archives

Estate planning: U.S. Senate bill seeks to change estate tax

Preparing one's estate can be a complicated process for many families here in California. An estate owner may have to decide what to do with a family home, certain heirlooms or the savings he or she has accumulated. Others may have to consider the process of how to manage passing down a family business or farm. A recent bill introduced in the senate may change the percentage of estate tax, and supporters claim that it will have a positive effect on those who want to leave their company to their children as part of the estate planning process.

Estate planning can be a positive experience

January is coming to an end and it's a time when many people turn their attention from the festivities of the holiday season to the far more serious issue of tax season in California. While tax season and estate planning may not, at first glance, seem closely related, a change in the tax law impacts how one may structure one's estate plan. The estate tax exemption increased dramatically, which affects how much money can be gifted. The new exemption amount is $11.18 million per person.

Stepfamilies and their implications on existing wills

Family structure has changed over the years in California. Divorces and second marriages have made stepfamilies commonplace. Multiple divorces can add complications to the situation where estate planning is concerned. Subsequent divorces can create a scenario where former stepchildren are now involved. Wills need to be periodically reviewed and amended to reflect family changes and clarify bequests.

Is having a will enough to protect estate assets?

The new year has begun and it is a time that people often take a measure of their lives and make goals for the coming year. Estate planning can figure into some of these goals. Life changes such as getting married, the birth of a child or starting a new job can inspire a person to write a will in California. But is having a will in place enough to protect one's estate assets?

Estate planning documents should be revised following a divorce

People in California marry for love, begin families and build futures together. Estate planning is frequently part of that process. While divorce is not the anticipated outcome when a couple marries, a significant percentage of marriages do end in divorce. In that event, an estate plan will need to be revised.